Hayle, Cornwall. Famous for its three mile stretch of soft golden sand, stretching from St Ives to Godrevy Lighthouse. Popular with holiday makers and offering a wide variety of activities and facilities just a short distance from the sea and one of the UK's most beautiful bays.

Hayle's rich engineering heritage

Our Heritage

Today Hayle's rich industrial past is recognised by being part of the UNESCO Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape World Heritage Site.

Located on the north coast of Cornwall next to an estuary, this area has been a focus for settlement and trade since at least the Bronze Age.

During the industrial revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries, Hayle developed into an industrial port serving Cornwall's mining industry. Rival foundries were built at either end of the town – Copperhouse Foundry and Harvey's Foundry – and were responsible for the town's rapid growth. Richard Trevithick and other engineers were drawn to Hayle as a place of innovation. In the 19th century, Harvey's was producing the largest steam engines ever built and exporting them worldwide. Hayle was a thriving port until WW2 when it became part of the war effort.

Today Hayle's rich industrial past is recognised by being part of the UNESCO Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape World Heritage Site.